Microbiology Now
Recent News |  Archives |  Tags |  Newsletter |  Message Board/Forum |  About |  Links |  Subscribe to MicrobiologyNow.com RSS Feed Subscribe


More Science Articles
Galactic serial killerGalactic serial killer

Tiny crystals to boost solarTiny crystals to boost solar

A new species of horseshoe worm discovered in Japan after a 62 year gapA new species of horseshoe worm discovered in Japan after a 62 year gap

Domain walls in nanowires cleverly set in motionDomain walls in nanowires cleverly set in motion

Faithful allies since the CretaceousFaithful allies since the Cretaceous

Earthquake simulation tops 1 quadrillion flopsEarthquake simulation tops 1 quadrillion flops

Babies prefer fairness -- but only if it benefits them -- in choosing a playmateBabies prefer fairness -- but only if it benefits them -- in choosing a playmate

Positive, negative thinkers' brains revealedPositive, negative thinkers' brains revealed

Ancient 'spider' images reveal eye-opening secretsAncient 'spider' images reveal eye-opening secrets

Future computers that are 'normally off'Future computers that are 'normally off'

An ultrathin collagen matrix biomaterial tool for 3D microtissue engineeringAn ultrathin collagen matrix biomaterial tool for 3D microtissue engineering

Friedreich's ataxia -- an effective gene therapy in an animal modelFriedreich's ataxia -- an effective gene therapy in an animal model

A new twist makes for better steel, researchers findA new twist makes for better steel, researchers find

Renewable energy market share climbs despite 2013 dip in investmentsRenewable energy market share climbs despite 2013 dip in investments

Research suggests autumn is ending later in the northern hemisphereResearch suggests autumn is ending later in the northern hemisphere

'Unzipping' poplars' biofuel potential'Unzipping' poplars' biofuel potential

Sniff study suggests humans can distinguish more  than 1 trillion scentsSniff study suggests humans can distinguish more than 1 trillion scents

Study finds gaming augments players' social livesStudy finds gaming augments players' social lives

A breakthrough in creating invisibility cloaks, stealth technologyA breakthrough in creating invisibility cloaks, stealth technology

Off the shelf, on the skin: Stick-on electronic patches for health monitoringOff the shelf, on the skin: Stick-on electronic patches for health monitoring

Overcoming structural uncertainty in computer modelsOvercoming structural uncertainty in computer models

Monkey caloric restriction study shows big benefit; contradicts earlier studyMonkey caloric restriction study shows big benefit; contradicts earlier study

Researchers developed world's first fluorescent sensor to detect date rape drugResearchers developed world's first fluorescent sensor to detect date rape drug

Protein called YAP gives blood vessels strength, shapeProtein called YAP gives blood vessels strength, shape

Strengthening learning in children: Get outside and playStrengthening learning in children: Get outside and play

Copied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithmsCopied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithms

Turning back the clock on aging muscles?Turning back the clock on aging muscles?

Gecko-inspired adhesion: Self-cleaning and reliableGecko-inspired adhesion: Self-cleaning and reliable

New study finds differences in concussion risk between football helmetsNew study finds differences in concussion risk between football helmets

Scientists find donut-shaped structure of enzyme involved in energy metabolism (2/21/2010)

Tags:
enzymes, metabolism, x-ray crystallography
In humans, proline is important for suppression of cancer, cell death and oxidation. Understanding the structure of this enzyme will help scientists better understand how it functions and develop drugs that may inhibit its catalytic function. -  Photo courtesy of MU News Bureau.
In humans, proline is important for suppression of cancer, cell death and oxidation. Understanding the structure of this enzyme will help scientists better understand how it functions and develop drugs that may inhibit its catalytic function. - Photo courtesy of MU News Bureau.

If subway terminals didn't exist and people had to exit subway stations to switch subway lines, transit time would increase. People also may encounter distractions, such as grabbing a cup of coffee, instead of getting on the other line. Molecules also use "terminals" to save transit time during enzyme-catalyzed processes. Using advanced X-radiation techniques, University of Missouri researchers were able to visualize one of these terminals inside of an enzyme that degrades proline, which is an amino acid that has a central role in metabolism. In humans, proline is important for suppression of cancer, cell death and oxidation. Understanding the structure of this enzyme will help scientists better understand how it functions and develop drugs that may inhibit its catalytic function.

"This is an aesthetically interesting enzyme that resembles a donut-shaped ring," said John Tanner, professor in the Department of Chemistry and the Department of Biochemistry. "Hidden under the surface of the protein is a system of tunnels and rooms - like a subway system for molecules. The purpose of this system is to provide an interior passageway connecting the two catalytic sites of the enzyme. The movement of reactant molecules through this passageway is known as channeling, which makes enzymes efficient by isolating the reactants from other enzymatic reactions. Channeling potentially allows for decreased transit time between catalytic sites and protection from competing enzymatic reactions. The reactions occur without the reactants ever leaving the confines of the protein, which is efficient."

In the study, several proline-degrading proteins were screened for their ability to crystallize. A crystal is needed in order to perform X-ray diffraction experiments, which provide high resolution images of the protein's three-dimensional structure. Additional studies using small-angle X-ray scattering and centrifugation provided crucial information about the protein's donut shape. These techniques help researchers determine the structure and composition of the enzyme.

"The complementary methods of the X-ray crystallography, small-angle X-ray scattering, and centrifugation gave us a whole picture of the structure of the enzyme," Tanner said. "Knowing the structure of the enzyme helps us understand the function of the enzyme. Once we know an enzyme's structure, we can begin to interpret other important data, such as the enzyme's role in specific reactions, how its activity is controlled and how a drug could inhibit the enzyme."

The study, "Crystal structure of the bifunctional Proline utilization A flavoenzyme from Bradyrhizobium japonicum," was published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this month.

Note: This story has been adapted from a news release issued by the University of Missouri-Columbia

Post Comments:

Search
New Articles
Researchers discover how the kissing disease virus hijacks human cells

Researchers develop novel molecular blood group typing technique

New methodology to find out about yeast changes during wine fermentation

Antibiotic resistance enzyme caught in the act

Leading virologists join together to address urgent viral threatLeading virologists join together to address urgent viral threat

New light shed on key bacterial immune system

Chikungunya poised to invade the AmericasChikungunya poised to invade the Americas

Identifie strategies for cultivating microalgae more efficiently to produce biodiesel

Immune cell defenders protect us from bacteria invasion

Tiny biomolecular tweezers studying force effect of cellsTiny biomolecular tweezers studying force effect of cells

Simple microfluidic devices now have valvesSimple microfluidic devices now have valves

How niffy nappies could help develop new weapons in fight against bacteria

New yeast species travelled the globe with a little help from the beetlesNew yeast species travelled the globe with a little help from the beetles

Can antibiotics cause autoimmunity?

Researchers identify good bacteria that protects against HIV



Archives
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009




Science Friends
Agricultural Science
Astronomy News
Biology News
Biomimicry Science
Cognitive Research
Chemistry News
Tissue Engineering
Cancer Research
Cybernetics Research
Electonics Research
Forensics Report
Fossil News
Genetic Archaeology
Genetics News
Geology News
Microbiology Research
Nanotech News
Parenting News
Physics News
  Archives |  Submit News |  Advertise With Us |  Contact Us |  Links
Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. All contents © 2000 - 2015 Web Doodle, LLC. All rights reserved.